SIGH

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I posted briefly in a comment that I am going to be moving to South Korea. I spent a year there between July of 2005 and July of 2006 as an English Teacher. I really enjoyed the culture, the food, the people and my job. The more I’m home, the more I wish I had never left.

So Monday night, a school offered me a contract. I was very excited because it was in Busan, not too far from where I taught last year and the money was very good. The academic supervisor was eager to hire me.

I got an email from my recruiter this morning that basically said, the school’s director overturned the academic supervisor and they are withdrawing the offer.

My language would have made a sailor blush.

The part that peeves me is that (in most cases) the director is a business person and the academic supervisor is an educator. So who is probably a better judge of who would be a good teacher? Most likely not the director.

Oh well. There are a zillion schools there looking for teachers. I’m sure I’ll find another position.

I’m just bummed out because I was so excited to be going back. And I feel rejected. Like what the heck is wrong with me?

But I’m going to put it out of my mind the rest of the weekend. There’s nothing I can do until the recruiter gets in touch with me on Monday.

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About katm

I'm just your typical depressed donkey. I'm an abuse survivor. I deal with the pain and stiffness and other fun stuff that goes with fibromyalgia. I used to teach English for a living but because of my health, that isn't any option anymore. I love to cook and feel most in my element when I'm in the kitchen tinkering around.

12 responses »

  1. I’m so sorry Kathryn, I know how much you wanted that job; you must be really gutted. Still, everything happens for a reason right? If it wasn’t meant to be, I’m sure it’s because there’s something better out there for you – You deserve the best you really do!

    There aren’t really anymore words i can offer you – at least none that will do any good!

    So here’s just my sympathy, and my well-wishes really.

    Good luck!

  2. There’s a reason, but the school just isn’t sharing it.

    I’ve got enough stuff to do this weekend to keep me busy, so I’m not stressing over it. Waste of my energy to get stressed out.

  3. I’m so sorry, that must be such a disapointment for you to say nothing of the anger at the injustice and illogicality of it all. How long were you in Korea for the last time and how did you come to be there? Don’t answer if you don’t want to…I am just curious and like hearing about other peoples lives.

  4. Yeah Sis. Definitely a disappointment. It was like the perfect job. And as far as logic… I saw some pretty illogical stuff the last time I taught there.

    I went over to teach English last time. I loved it so much. I’m really sorry I came home to begin with. Seems like I’ve pretty much had nothing but stress since I got here. That’s the big reason I want to go back.

    Amazing country. Wonderful culture. Friendly people. Delicious food. I even grew to love kimchi, LOL.

  5. I like kimchi. When I celebrated my Independence Day this February 2nd that’s what I had.

    I figure I’ll comment on the rest when you journal on it.
    Austin

  6. Errm, ‘cuse my ignorance but what is kimchi? I hope it isn’t dead dog or cat meat, as i have heard that they eat that there.

  7. LOL.

    No, not meat at all. Kimchi is spicy pickled cabbage. Sort of like a Korean sauerkraut. They eat it with almost every meal.

    I went to an English camp my school sponsored a few weeks into my last stay. At each meal, there was rice, soup and kimchi. Not very nice on a westerner’s stomach. I ate rice for three days. I was never so happy to get back to my apartment and order pizza.

    But in time, I learned to love kimchi. I even know how to make a Korean. Kimchi Chun. It’s sort of like a pancake. The batter is just flour, water and a little salt. Then you chop up the kimchi to mix in and fry it like a pancake. The trick is to get the batter the right consistency… I always seemed to end up with too much batter. Oh, it’s too thick. Add a little water. Whoops now too thin. Add some more flour. Well… you see where it’s going.

    On the note of eating strange meats… the entire staff took a day trip to a temple not far from the city the school was in. After walking around the grounds for a couple hours we went to an older lady’s house who specialized in cooking black goat for people. I swear we ate almost the entire goat. It was cooked in different ways, some not cooked at all. I’m not much into raw meat… The final course was a soup. It actually tasted quite good. Then they informed us (us being the other American teacher and me) what part of the goat it came from. The brain and the spinal cord. I liked it a lot better before I knew what was in it…

  8. hang in there, things will turn around for you, you must believe!!!
    oh yes, please don’t tell us what is in the food we are eating, especially what we consider “foreign”

    peace and blessings

    keepers

  9. Phew! Sigh of relief there.

    As a ‘mainly-vegetarian-but-oft-needs-a-bit-of-meat’ kind of a person, I find myself worrying about what goes into the prepared foods that we occasionally buy at the supermarket or restaurant. But, brains and spinal cord…eeeuuwww! Watch out for that, K, as that is one way of nasty viruses like Kuru and BSE getting into humans. There is even a body of researchers who believe that the viruses that make up the HIV group (there are more than one and they are each slightly different) originated from the African bush meat practices (monkey brains and what not).

    Having said that, I can remember my own Dad relishing a plate of sweetbreads….the term used for brains (from dead sheep or beef cattle) and asking me (at the age of 10) whether I would like some. It looked perfectly revolting and smelt similarly so….but it is a memory I will never forget. Sweetbreads and the sale of brain or nervous tissue (that doesn’t sound right…I mean tissue with nerve matter) is now banned in the UK since the BSE problems came to light many years ago.

    Did the Koreans go in for the dried, salted peas that you can buy in Hong Kong? I used to love that. I also love Japanese dried seaweed.

  10. Oh I was totally disgusted after I found out what I had eaten. The first thing that went through my mind “OMG! Is there a goat version of BSE????”

    It would have been better for my mental health had they not told me what I had just eaten…

    I’m trying to remember on the pea things. For some reason it rings a bell. Maybe they had them at bars? I don’t know. I think I went to a total of 2 bars over the course of a year.

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